Give your outlines the royal treatment

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Ok. So you’ve decided you want to write a book. Just like many other hopefuls. Or maybe you’re a seasoned pro and you feel the need to get more organized so your story flows even better. Well I applaud you, and hope this post will help you.

It’s about outlines.

Outlines are Royal. Not that they sit on thrones and wear Crowns and Tiaras, but they keep both new and experienced writers on track.

Some folks don’t use outlines, they want flexibility, feel their creative juices stymied by all those headings and subheadings. Ok. Well I respect people who don’t use outlines, since everyone has their own way of doing things.

But your creative juices don’t have to be restricted with an outline. Now here’s the kicker: outlines are made to be flexible. Just cause your character Johnny B. is going to buy a singing toucan in chapter five, doesn’t mean he can’t buy two singing toucans in chapter seven. Or add a tap-dancing pigeon for good measure in chapter eight.

As your story evolves and takes on its own identity, so will your outline. I know because this has happened to me countless times, as I’ve found my Johnnys stocking up on different types of avians.

You can have your cake and eat it too. For all those super-organized people you get your outline, and for all you “I don’t believe in outline” folks you get your flexibility.

Experiment. Play around with different strategies, in the end you’ll find an outlining system that works best for you. In the end you’ll be sitting on your outlining throne, feeling pretty damn royal about your organized self.

Purchasing toucans are optional.

T.A. UNER is the Author of various novels and short stories. Please be sure to follow him on LeopardKingSaga.com, where he blogs regularly about writing and self-improvement. You can also subscribe to his blog posts and have them delivered directly to your e-mail inbox. If you do this he will dance on his hands.

Crown image by Albertito M. Graphic used for blogging purposes only.

Good Fiction versus Bad Fiction

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We often hear about how some poorly-written book hits the big time and sells millions of copies. How do these writers manage to pull it off?

Well some degree of luck is involved, after all, writing, like any art medium is highly-subjective. Success is usually out of a writer’s control. But we can still do our best to provide the public with well-written stories, and leave its reception to the masses.

Most of the information contained here is common sense. Still, it never hurts to review and make sure you’re on the right track. Let’s begin:

GOOD FICTION:Shows the reader through descriptive measures, and allows them to come to their own conclusion. That’s what writing is, isn’t it? It’s about the reader experience, and a good book will appeal to different people in different ways. Get the most out of your storytelling.

BAD FICTION:Second guesses the reader and explains everything. Instead of writing out the scene, the novice writer will feel the need to explain everything in the scene, taking the reading experience away from the reader. This is one sure way to alienate your readers, and cheating them of an excellent literary experience.

Of course, this advice is also subjective and it doesn’t guarantee a bestseller. Certain books, for whatever reason, defy the ground rules of storytelling and still make it big in the literary marketplace.

But why risk it? If you do write, make it your goal to pen your tale as unobtrusively as possible.

T.A. UNER is the Author of various novels and short stories. Please be sure to follow him on LeopardKingSaga.com, where he blogs about writing, self-publishing and sales & marketing. You can also subscribe to his blog posts and have them delivered directly to your e-mail inbox. He’ll dance on his hands if you do.