The truth about “bad” reviews

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Some of the newer writers out there might get a little peeved at bad reviews. But seriously, what is a bad review? How does a review become bad?

Well, technically, it’s when a reader doesn’t like your book. Ok. Let’s take a look at this. So someone didn’t like it. Does that make the book bad?

Course not. Listen, unless most or all of the reviews are bad there’s really nothing to worry about. As a reader, I’d actually be suspicious if all the reviews for a book were glowing. Wouldn’t that look suspicious? There’s enough of those fishy reviews to go around anyways.

So here’s my take on “bad” reviews. They’re good. Why? Because they add legitimacy to your book.

So when you free yourself from the unrealistic fact that everyone will love your book, you’ll be more relaxed, and your writing will flow.

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When is it time to quit?

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This post is for all those writers out there, or wannabe writers. Or anyone who is invested in the arts. So pretty much everyone artistically-inclined.

Quitting. It’s a disease that affects the best of us. And it can really hit you when you’re about to break.

There are many causes: Family issues, work, health degradation, etc. But let’s narrow it down a bit. It’s called Lack of Commercial Success in the Arts.

Trust me, it’s great how now anyone can become a writer. The gatekeepers no longer block hopeful writers who dream of publication.

But the onslaught of indie books has made the market more difficult to break into. Especially when you’re just starting out.

But what if you’ve been in the game and are still struggling to sell books?

Well you have two options. You can keep writing, or, you can quit.

If you decide to quit then that is your choice. Especially if other pressing matters take center stage in your life. However, if you keep writing, you should remember one thing. Do it for yourself. Don’t write for an audience, or fame, or a huge payout. If you do this I can almost guarantee you that the pressure to succeed will dissipate, and your love of writing will be the only thing that matters.

Take it from someone who has pondered quitting.

Quote of the day

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Here’s a quote from my new YA novel Guns And Dogs.

“Happiness isn’t something you pick up at the grocery store, nor is it something that comes to you at a certain age. It’s a trait that lives within all of us, and it flourishes when you begin appreciating the things in life we take for granted.”

The worst thing a Writer can do to their career.

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This is going to be a quick post. Not a lot of hooplah or paragraphs of advice chock full of detailed explanations.

Guys and Gals. I’ve been seeing more and more of this amateurish behavior from so many newbie writers. You know what it is?

Ok. Here it is. Plain and simple. If you’ve written one book, don’t stop there. Go on and start writing that second one, and while you’re doing that start planning the 3rd one.

I’m tired of seeing people spam their one book on social media and hoping to hit it big. Chances are, unless you’re Harper Lee or J.D. Salinger, you’re not gonna hit it big with that first one.

Call me negative, call me a misogynistic scribbler. I can take it. But if you’re banking on that ONE BOOK you really need a reality check.

Now, if you have written one book and it’s ranked in the top 100 on amazon.com, congratulations. In that case, you can disregard this post.

 

 

The Dangers of Writing

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Normally you wouldn’t associate danger with writing. Except that’s not the type of danger I’m about to discuss. Read on.

The dangers I’m talking about here starts with unrealistic expectations. Say you become a Writer and expect the world to stop for your novel and embrace it. The huge book tours, the six-figure advances and movie deals. You get the picture.

When you start having delusions of grandeur regarding your writing and its results that’s when you need to take  a step back and get yourself together.

Always remember. Fame and fortune are great, but in the end they’re status symbols and mark the materialistic gain that comes from your writing. Everyone knows that it doesn’t happen to everyone. If you get lucky and it happens for you, wonderful, but if it doesn’t you shouldn’t be pushing the panic buttons.

That’s what happens in today’s society. Most people today will measure you on how many books you’ve sold, or how many movie deals you’ve inked. But usually those occurances are out of your control. They either happen or they don’t. But don’t fret, there’s another way to measure success, and believe me this is something that you have complete control over.

It’s called writing. It’s called editing. It’s called trying to produce the best piece of work you’re possible of creating. Those are the only things that a Writer should  be concerned with. And if you focus on these things, and keep your goals reasonable, then the dangers of writing will be a thing of the past.

T.A. UNER is the Author of various novels and short stories. Please be sure to follow him on LeopardKingSaga.com, where he blogs about writing, publishing, and life. Please subscribe to his blog posts and have them delivered directly to your e-mail inbox. He will dance on his hands if you do.

Your book isn’t selling? Try this method instead.

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In today’s crowded literary market it can be frustrating to make a name for yourself. As you spend money to produce, edit, and market your work, the big picture can get lost in the publishing shuffle.

“What do I do?” You ask? Don’t sweat it. There is a way to get your books noticed. And no excessive money is require for marketing.

The key is persistence. That and getting quality books to market while building your brand. This is the only way to ensure your legacy as a writer. And always you make sure you write what you want to write. Chasing the marketing, as I’m sure many of you already know, is a losing scenario.

There is only one you out there, so show the world what you’re made of. And don’t settle for less when writing. Succeed on your own terms. That’s the best way.

T.A. UNER is the Author of various novels and short stories. Please be sure to follow him on LeopardKingSaga.com, where he blogs about writing, publishing, and life. Please subscribe to his blog posts and have them delivered directly to your e-mail inbox. He will dance on his hands if you do.

 

 

The path to writing success runs through this

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Some of the best experiences come from mistakes. And writers who learn from them put themselves in a strong position to achieve their literary goals.

But let me tell you something you’ve probably learned on your own, it’s a long, painful road to success. Good things take time, but you can gain experience without unnecessary frustration from networking with other authors.

Especially ones who’ve achieved success in the battlefield we call publishing.

Sure it may be tough to build relationships with such folks, but it can be done. Keep an eye out on who’s who in the book world, especially the names in your genre. Then, reach out to them and try to build a relationship.

Not everyone will gift you their time, but some just might. And it is through these relationships you can pick up valuable tips which you otherwise would’ve had to learn through trial and error.

I know this as a fact, since I was fortunate enough to find a lady who has achieved unprecedented success as an independent writer. Her debut book was a blockbuster, and she keeps going from strength to strength.

Again, it’s not easy, but if you get yourself out there and try and build genuine relationships with successful authors, you may just tap into some really invaluable advice.

T.A. UNER is the Author of various novels and short stories. Please be sure to follow him on LeopardKingSaga.com, where he blogs about writing, publishing, and life. Please subscribe to his blog posts and have them delivered directly to your e-mail inbox. He will dance on his hands if you do.

How to balance your writing with life

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Alright, I’m guessing most of you writers and artists out there have day jobs. And even if you don’t, for whatever reason, your writing isn’t paying the bills.

At least not yet.

Maybe you’re writing solely for expression and plan on independent publishing. Or instead working towards making it via a traditional publishing route.

Both are viable routes, but one thing you really must remember is the age old saying that’s become cliche: “Don’t quit that day job, just yet.”

Very few writers can afford to. So how does one balance a day job while trying to write? It can be irksome to a few who also have families to care for. But hey, listen, there’s hope.

The answer is to make time. Any bit of writing is better than no writing. And trust me, it gets easier as you successfully manage the two. It’s a balancing act for sure, but nobody said this writing business was going to be easy.

Right now, think of it as a hobby. If you make it, great. If not, keeping plugging away, and don’t ever compare yourself to other writers who’ve “made it.” Because trust me, even they’ve got their own set of problems.

So what are you waiting for? Put the kids to bed and crank up that word processor!

T.A. UNER is the Author of various novels and short stories. Please be sure to follow him on LeopardKingSaga.com, where he blogs about writing, publishing, and life. Please subscribe to his blog posts and have them delivered directly to your e-mail inbox. He will dance on his hands if you do.