The long, and painful road to success

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Alex Ovechkin, Captain of the Washington Capitals, an NHL Club based in the USA, lifts the Prestigious Stanley Cup, one of the most important sports trophies in the world.

I must admit, these past few days have been pure ecstasy for me. Especially today, June 12th, 2018 when the entire city of my hometown, Washington D.C. created a spectacle honoring the achievement of its hockey club, the Washington Capitals, who won the Stanley Cup, the holy grail of North American Hockey, that has been awarded to NHL champions since 1892. It was the first championship for the expectant Capitals, and the first major sports title for the Washington, D.C. area since 1992. The parade today made me think real hard about my own journey, especially where my writing career was concerned.

Why am I blogging about this? Well, if you think writing, or art for that matter, is connected with the Capitals’ first championship, you guessed correctly.

But the story would make little sense if I didn’t delve deeper into the Capitals’ once-turbulent playoff history. A past filled with so many tragic seasons where the club under performed in the playoffs despite high expectations. To make matters worse, every year when the playoffs rolled around almost always resulted in another premature exit at the hand of one of their rivals, thus adding another sad page to the club’s tortuous playoff mishaps.

Honestly, this team wasn’t even supposed to win a Championship, let alone make the playoffs. But this group of resilient players persevered, and managed to overcome the decades-long playoff failures that had plagued the club since the late 1980s.

This is where art, or writing for that matter, comes into play. You can write for many years, and wrack up an unhealthy load of rejections along the way. Just like the Capitals you can gain strength from your failures, instead of letting the failures define you.

It’s cliche to say it’s the journey that counts, not the destination, but the fact is that there is no greater teacher of life than the failures you encounter, and a team I have followed since I was a 13-year-old boy proved that to me.

So learn to accept failure as a healthy gauge that can be your compass to bigger and better things.

Just ask the Washington Capitals.

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Quote of the day: 11/17/17

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“The beauty of art is that it comes from the heart.”
T.A. Uner

Author Interview coming soon!

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I’ve been asked to be interviewed by literary blogger L.M. Durand. This should prove interesting as I discuss writing and other helpful tips for writers. More information on the interview release date coming soon!

Meanwhile, you can check out L.M.Durand’s twitter profile HERE.

When Writers can’t write

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It happens to all of us. Suddenly our fingers don’t want to cooperate with our minds, and our passion for wordsmithing evaporates faster than a desert mirage.

So what do you do when the well of creation dries up? Take a vacation? Catch that new movie you’ve wanted to see? Clip your overgrown toenails?

Well…yeah. Duh! Just make sure you something that doesn’t involving writing. That’s what I’m doing now. I’m taking my mind off resuming my next project-which has been a novel I started way back in 2012-by doing something productive. Writing a blog post about why I can’t write right now. Whew!

Sometimes taking a break can do wonders. The worst thing you can do to yourself is force the issue and write something that doesn’t flow from the heart. And let’s be brutally honest here, writing is something that always derives from the human heart.

Listen, unless you’re a big-time writer with a deadline, you shouldn’t be worrying about why you cannot write.

Most of us will never cash a seven figure check for our writing efforts. I say this not to be negative, but to ground everyone out there in reality, so you can focus on treating your writing as a hobby, and not stressing over it for whatever reason impeding you.

Eventually you’ll get back behind your word processor, and the time spent away will have done wonders for your creativity. Writing doesn’t have to be stressful. Quite the opposite, it should be fun, and when it’s not fun anymore, that’s your cue to pursue another interest.

What Prince meant to my Universal Soul

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These past few days have been strange ones. Not just because the world lost one of it’s greatest musical talents, but because I had felt something tugging at my soul. It was almost as if there was some disturbance in the universe.

You can call me crazy.I think I might be. After all, who would become a Writer in the first place, right? An occupation that gifts its users with a never-ending barrage of words that must be re-edited until madness descends upon the soul.

Well it must said that I was listening to some heavy doses of Prince’s music for the past few days before his departure. Call it premonition or just a massive helping of coincidence. Some higher power was asking me to honor one of its greatest creations as his time on this planet in the flesh was drawing to an end.

Then the news came of his death. It saddened me like it did so many others. But I do not weep for his death. For someone as talented as he was, death is but a momentary lapse of reality. Prince was just one of those mega-stars, like Micheal Jackson, Elvis and Curt Cobain. Now his legacy takes its rightful place next to all the other Legends who preceded him into the great unknown we call death.

So I say this to Prince’s soul, or whatever caused me to honor his timeless tunes even before he left us, thank you for touching my artistic soul. I will never be the same.