Making the most of Winter Writing.

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With some of us living in cold climes, winter can really get us down. I’ve already been hit with half a foot of snow, with more on the way. In the past this would be a one-way ticket to depressive thoughts of cabin fever. But as a writer it’s important to see the benefits of inclement weather.

For example, for years I let the weather, an external force, influence my inner-self. The best part of myself where authentic writing comes from. As years went by, and I slowly matured, I began to think less of the external conditions, and focus more on what my imagination had to offer.

This same approach works best with everything else in life, not just your writing. Because if you’ve already got yourself down from something that has nothing to do with who you really are, you’re already setting yourself up for failure.

Enjoy the rest of your January, and use inclement weather time to crank out your best work!

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When adversity strikes Authors

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As many of you know, I’ve been working on my latest novel, The Leopard Apocalypse, which is the 3rd and penultimate novel in the Leopard King Saga, my flagship Historical Fantasy series.

I’m coming to the very end of editing, and nearing the stage where I send the book out for beta-reading before sending the final work to an editor to polish off the book and make suggestions.

Normally this would be a happy time for any author. Especially for a novel that is close to 200K words and has taken half a decade to complete.

But adversity struck last week when I realized my funds for interior artwork and editing services was not adequate to continue.

It’s a major problem, and will undoubtedly cause delays. I still have hope of publication in early to mid 2019.

So what do you do when you’re nearing the finish line, only to be slowed down by inadequate funds?

Well, the only thing to do is remain calm, and try and do as much work you can to move the editing process along, even if that means the interior map and editing stages may have to take a back seat.

So for now, I’m in a jam, but like all setbacks, it’s only temporary.

Do you have a story you’d like to share about an issue that has delayed a project when you were so closed to completion? If so, I’d like to hear about your experiences in the comments section.

See you next time!

What are your Fall Writing Plans?

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Well Summer is almost over (bummer, right?) and with that the hot, humid writing days.

Things are looking up for me. I recently got hired as a Technical Writer for a Defense Contractor and am looking forward to my first day at work this week.

But what about you? Now that summer is over what are your writing plans? Are you working on a short story, novella or novel? Is this your first work? Are you considering going the self-publishing route or traditional path by seeking a publisher/agent?

I’d like to hear from anyone.

Here’s to the end of summer and the beginning of a productive fall writing period!

What are your goals for 2018?

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It’s been almost two weeks into the new year. I’ve been taking time off from my writing to recharge the batteries and get myself ready for more writing and editing in the next week.

Back-to-back family Birthdays coming up next week will cap off a productive rest period in which I emerged from the wake of my 5-year writing journey to complete The Leopard Apocalypse.

So what are your goals for 2018? Are you going to start or finish that novel you’ve been thinking of? Or maybe write a screenplay. What challenges are you facing or plan to face when embarking on a new project.

If you’ve got something in the works, please leave a comment. I’d like to know. Wishing you the best for 2018!

The Road of life

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As many of you know I recently signed a 2-book deal with Kensington Gore, a publisher in the UK. But what was my writing life like before that? How did I arrive there?

Well it started back in 5th grade. 1985 was the year. It began with a story about a character named Jet-thrust. He was a robot that traveled the universe looking for adventures and fighting all kinds of evil doers. I then added a brother for Jet-thrust, calling him Fighter, and then we had a duo of do-gooders.

Then. For whatever reason. I stopped writing. I went through life without writing another word, that is until 2003 rolled along. I was looking for a hobby that would take up a lot of time and was relatively inexpensive. At first I didn’t know what to write about so I wrote a bunch of novels as a learning experience. None of those got published. But I learned a lot about myself and my writing. I read more books, and read books about writing. Then I wrote some more.

Finally I decided to self-publish. That was in 2013. I learned the value of having a good cover, and hiring a good editor. And I always made sure that each book was the best I could make it. Editing was a thankless job so I settled on a great editor named Amanda Horan. Later she recommended my writing to a publisher in UK called Kensington Gore. After waiting a few months they decided to acquire the publishing rights to two of my books.

So that’s been the road map to my writing life. And I’m sure there’s still more to come.

What about you? Think about your life in perspective. Your journey, wherever you are right now. Where do you want to go? And what great things do you want to achieve?

How to honor your Editor

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Now that November is here, I figured I’d write a post on editing. Let me tell you, when I first began my publishing odyssey, I knew nothing about editing. Sure, I’d edit my own books, but that was it. I felt that spending money on editing was a waste.

How wrong I was.

Editors and beta-readers are a key component to the writing process. They act as a safety net, and find everything you miss when you self-edit. But finding an editor that is best for you isn’t easy. But it’s a journey worth embarking on. Let me explain.

I went through many editors. Some were mediocre, but most were subpar. Then I finally settled on one. An Irish Lady named Amanda, who lives with a mischievous little African Grey Parrot called Lilo. There were times when we argued, and I felt our working relationship wouldn’t last. Perhaps it was my fault. Who knows? I can be difficult sometimes when it comes to my work. But in the end, Amanda was the one, the best editor a writer could ask for. After all, how many editors end up becoming your friends?

And then there’s Lilo, who could ever forget Lilo? The repetitive little talking birdie who won my heart, and often serves as an example to me not to take myself too seriously.

So, the morale of this story is simple. If you find an editor that just feels right, by all means, grab onto them like dear life. Make sure to value them like a life preserver, because they’ll save your writing, trust me I know.

And if they own a talking birdie, well that just a bonus!

The truth about “bad” reviews

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Some of the newer writers out there might get a little peeved at bad reviews. But seriously, what is a bad review? How does a review become bad?

Well, technically, it’s when a reader doesn’t like your book. Ok. Let’s take a look at this. So someone didn’t like it. Does that make the book bad?

Course not. Listen, unless most or all of the reviews are bad there’s really nothing to worry about. As a reader, I’d actually be suspicious if all the reviews for a book were glowing. Wouldn’t that look suspicious? There’s enough of those fishy reviews to go around anyways.

So here’s my take on “bad” reviews. They’re good. Why? Because they add legitimacy to your book.

So when you free yourself from the unrealistic fact that everyone will love your book, you’ll be more relaxed, and your writing will flow.

The Author who is also a Book

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Ever wonder where I (or any writer for that matter) get my fiction ideas from? I’d say it is a combination of things. First life experience comes into play. The combined collection of memories accumulated from my day-to-day events. Both good and bad.

I have pain. We all do. That’s what makes us human. I take my pain and use it in my stories to give humanity to my characters. Look at Tullus or Celestra from my Leopard King Saga series. Or Liberty Rise from Mindcop Dossiers.  I’d be selling them short by making them omnipotent. Who wants to read about characters like that?

It’s cliche, but troubled characters work best when drawn-upon from personal experience. That doesn’t mean you put yourself in the story. In that case you’re better off writing non-fiction (Which I read a lot, by the way.)

Fiction is a compass that points towards life. No matter how make-believe a story is, or if its genre is pure fantasy. People read to learn more about human nature and find meaning in their lives and the world around them.

What do you think?

The truth about editing

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If you’ve ever published a book, or have considered publishing a book. Then remember these five words: editing is an ongoing process.

You’re probably wondering what I mean by that. Well, it’s simple, don’t think for a moment when you’re published that the work is done. Let me explain.

When I first embarked on my independent writing career I knew nothing about producing the best book possible. I thought that writing the book itself was enough.

Sadly. I was wrong.

A lot of editing goes into a book. First you self-edit it when it’s done, then you turn it over to a skilled editor and he/she tackles it before you confirm or reject their edits.

Then the beta-reader stage begins. Trust me. You should have at least half a dozen beta-readers. The reason for this is the more eyes, the better their chances of catching manuscript errors. But trust me, it doesn’t end there. Then you give the beta-read manuscript another look before handing it back to your editor before it is published.

But wait. You’re still not done. After you’ve published your work, typos, grammatical errors and other unwelcome guests will pop up. Sometimes, you’ll spot em on your own, other times, readers will notify you.

It is your lifelong duty as an author to always update your books when errors are spotted. Books are like people, they’re constantly growing and needing corrections to be better.

Will your work ever be perfect? Never. But then again, who is?

When is it time to quit?

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This post is for all those writers out there, or wannabe writers. Or anyone who is invested in the arts. So pretty much everyone artistically-inclined.

Quitting. It’s a disease that affects the best of us. And it can really hit you when you’re about to break.

There are many causes: Family issues, work, health degradation, etc. But let’s narrow it down a bit. It’s called Lack of Commercial Success in the Arts.

Trust me, it’s great how now anyone can become a writer. The gatekeepers no longer block hopeful writers who dream of publication.

But the onslaught of indie books has made the market more difficult to break into. Especially when you’re just starting out.

But what if you’ve been in the game and are still struggling to sell books?

Well you have two options. You can keep writing, or, you can quit.

If you decide to quit then that is your choice. Especially if other pressing matters take center stage in your life. However, if you keep writing, you should remember one thing. Do it for yourself. Don’t write for an audience, or fame, or a huge payout. If you do this I can almost guarantee you that the pressure to succeed will dissipate, and your love of writing will be the only thing that matters.

Take it from someone who has pondered quitting.